Articles

 

Chequers

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'This still stands on the corner of Cromer Hyde lane a mile or so north of Lemsford  on the Hatfield to Wheathamstead road, and to Mary and I in our youth and to Eileen and I when we were courting it was a well known spot. '

The Memories of The Chequers ( Crooked Chimney) featuring Ernest Brown my Uncle.

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Life in a Victorian
Gamekeepers Cottage.

The future George V and  Lord Mount Stephen  at one of the shoots. Dad is the boy with the guns at the back. To

'My grandfathers whole existence, together with his fellow keepers, was to rear , tend and guard the thousands of pheasants, bred for the great shoots for which Brocket was famous. The future King George V was a renowned shot and sometimes went to Brocket, so it was important that everything, including a generous supply of birds, was the best possible.'

The story of H.J.Browns grandfather and his life as a Victorian Gamekeeper

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Alfred Henry Brown

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'Alfred Henry Brown was born at Basingstoke, Hampshire on April 3rd 1867,where his father, Joseph Brown, worked on the railway. He had a good voice when he was a boy and sang in the choir of Winchester Cathedral, where he won a gold watch. When he died it was buried with him'

The life of H.J.Browns Grandfather

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Herbert Brown.

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'My Father, Herbert Brown, was the second son of Alfred and Mary Ann Brown and was born in the left hand cottage that still stands outside the gates of St. Pauls Walden church, Herts. His Father was under gamekeeper on the Earl of Strathmores estate. When Alfred went to work for Lord Mount Stephen at Brocket Park, Lemsford, the family lived in a four roomed cottage (one of a pair) at the end of Cromer Hyde lane.'

The start of the life & times of Herbert Brown, father of H.J.Brown

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Mary Ann Adams

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Mary Ann Childs was born at Hertford Heath, near Hertford, the seventh child of James and Mary Ann Childs. We could not find her in the Register, nor could we find any of her brothers and sisters, but when registration was introduced in 1837, it was not compulsory and did not become an offence not to do so until many years later.

The story of Mary Ann Childs as told by H.J.Brown

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May Hawkins

 

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When she was about five years old she and her brother Percy joined her older brothers at Lemsford school, about two and a half miles from home. It had been built in the 19th century by the wealthy Desborough family, who had built others in Hertfordshire including one at Birch Green, near Hertford,

Of all my aunts and uncles, and Mum came from a family of six and Dad from a family of eleven, it was my dear Auntie May that I knew the best
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Mary Ann Brown

(nee Abbey)

Mary Ann Brown

'Mary Ann was the eldest daughter of George and Ann Abbey and was born at St Pauls Walden, Herts., on June 3rd 1873 where her father was a gardener.'

 

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Lord Mount Stephen

Mary Ann Brown

'No local history of the Lemsford era would be complete without some reference to Lord Mount Stephen, who leased Brocket Hall and Estates from the Cowper Family in 1893 and lived there until his death in 1921.'

 

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Victorian photographer

 

One day, about 100 years ago, a Victorian photographer set up his apparatus in Hertingfordbury, a village just outside Hertford, and the few people about paused to see what he was up to, or came out to see what was happening.

 

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Blind Dates

When the public telephone service was first introduced it was inevitable that men and women would get to know each other over the phone and occasions would arise when they wanted to meet in person.

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Z Batteries

Those of us that still recall the London Blitz will remember gazing up at the night sky full of bursting anti aircraft shells and getting some satisfaction that  we were hitting back. Churchill is supposed to have backed this ferocious barrage because it helped keep up moral.

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Dads Army

Image frommums-the-word-on-dads-army-film/

Many people who watch with amusement  the antics of Mr Mainwaring and the Home Guard might not realise that in the  last war the Post Office had its own Home Guard Battalions, whose escapades sometimes were just as hilarious as the TV classic.On  the telephone side each exchange or group of exchanges formed companies  and every night there were two or three home guards on duty at each building.

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Memories of the London manual exchanges in the 1940s

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Mn 1912 telephone services (except Hull )were nationalised and became Post Office Telephones. and was financed by the Treasury, From then on the money that was spent was what was allocated each year. The procedure then, as it probably is today

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The coming of the teenagers

From the website HOLLYWOODLAND  A site about Hollywood and its history

As I write these notes in 2006, the news and television programmes are full of the problems of teenagers. They spend too much, smoke too much,behave badly,complain they are bored and have nothing to doWhen we were young and so different, and wonder how it all happened.

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